Coronavirus Italy

COVID and Nationalism: Italy as the Canary in the Coal Mine

By Katherine Everitt

In spite of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) attempt to streamline research and restrictions in light of COVID-19, states have largely taken an independent and often nationalistic approach to their battle against COVID. From the U.S. decrying the WHO as an agent of China to EU states reasserting their once dissolved borders, we have approached a stunning paradox: the resurgence of nationalism amidst a global, unifying experience.

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Coronavirus Italy

The Virus and the State

André Liebich

Now that “de-confinement” is taking place throughout most of Europe we can draw conclusions. Clearly, people are more attached to their security than to their freedoms. Invasive tracing applications, regardless of the assurances given by their promoters, are the most recent demonstration of this fact.

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Coronavirus Italy

The attitudes of Non State-Wide Parties in Spain during the Covid-19 crisis

Ayoze Corujo

Covid-19 has exposed the fragility of the Spanish Government led by Pedro Sánchez. Mr Sánchez presides over a coalition cabinet made up of the social democrats (PSOE) and the extreme left (Podemos) with a combined number of 155 seats, in a 350 seats national parliament. Lacking an absolute majority in parliament, the government of Pedro Sánchez had, since the beginning of the legislature, to negotiate point by point every new piece of legislation and major decision with various parties such as the Basque nationalists of the PNV or the Catalan sovereigntists of the ERC. 

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Coronavirus Italy

Nationalism and Coronavirus in a Divided Society

Sam Pryke

An attribute of a nation, according to Miroslav Hroch, is a belief in horizontal unity, i.e. the perception that national togetherness overrides internal divisions like social class.  Britain, especially England, is historically a country steeped in class divisions.  BREXIT exposed a cultural divide, one of age, geographic location and internal nation (principally England v. Scotland) that didn’t run neatly along class lines.  The emphatic Conservative majority in the December 2019 general election settled the UK’s departure from the EU (if not the terms) and thereby ended the wrangling, but the divisions were still there as 2020 began. 

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Coronavirus Italy

Covid-19 crisis and nativist rhetoric in Bangladesh

Ala Uddin

In times of a major crisis such as the current one caused by Covid-19, nationalism and various exclusive and nativist views seem to gain prominence. They open windows for processes of drawing a distinction between ‘us’ and ‘them’, othering, blaming, and scapegoating. This short essay offers an overview of the emergence of nativist discourses during the Covid-19 crisis in Bangladesh. 

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Coronavirus Italy

Renewed Scapegoating: Political Rhetoric and the Other in a Time of Pandemic

Andi Haxhiu

As the advancement in medical response has significantly impacted the ways the world deals with viruses, there is one constant search for a scapegoat that, despite the development of technology, resurfaces as the alternative that redirects attention in times of crisis. When the bubonic plague was sweeping through Europe seven centuries ago, it was the Jews who were blamed for the Black Death. Historians argue that many of them were massacred because of the collective belief that they were spreading the sickness through poisoning wells and deliberate attempts to infect others.

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Coronavirus Italy

Nationalism and (Covid-19) Crisis

Edinburgh Nationalism Blog welcomes the submission of short Op-Ed pieces (500-700 words) exploring the implications of COVID-19 for nationalism, nation-states and identities.

While it is clear that COVID-19 did not create nationalism or enable its comeback, for it was never gone, amid the pandemic, nationalism has gained heighted scholarly, media and public salience and is surging worldwide.

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Class War

Michael Lind—Marx or List?

Jonathan Hearn

Michael Lind’s new book The New Class War: Saving Democracy from the Metropolitan Elite (2020, Atlantic Books) is a compact argument aimed at a general readership.  In it Lind makes the case for a revival of ‘democratic pluralism’, his term for the post-WWII left-right consensus politics of the US and Europe, exemplified by FDR’s ‘New Deal’, and sometimes referred to as the ‘Keynesian consensus’. 

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Spirit of the law

The Letter and the Spirit of Democracy

Jonathan Hearn

As I begin to write this on 19 October, Michael Gove is speaking for the government in Parliament against the Letwin Amendment, which requires that implementing legislation be passed before the Prime Minister’s ‘Brexit Deal’ is approved by Parliament.  Once again, he gives the refrain that respect for democracy requires that Parliament support a deal, because that’s what the people voted for (by 52%).  

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30th ASEN ANNUAL CONFERENCE: NATIONALISM AND MULTICULTURALISM

The 30th Annual Conference of the Association for the Study of Ethnicity and Nationalism (ASEN) will take place on 22-23 April 2020. This year’s theme will be Nationalism and Multiculturalism. The Annual Conference will take place in Edinburgh and is organised in cooperation with ASEN Edinburgh.  The Anthony D. Smith Lecture will take place on 21 April 2020. Please, submit your abstract by 15 November 2019.

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